Friday, March 30

Rupi Kaur - The Sun And Her Flowers


First and foremost, this blog is not necessarily a book review blog. Although I am, at present, reading and reviewing these books; it's not because I consider myself an expert my any means. 

I wanted to start this challenge because I know I don't read anywhere near as much as I used to, which is a shame, but also because I have a particular interest in book cover design. I think a great cover is one that picks up on minute themes within the book and can express them in a clever and subtle way. These Kafka cover reimaginings by Peter Mendulsund, for instance. They're brilliantly abstract and perfectly convey in incredible shorthand what's happening inside. Or even this beautiful edition of The Lord of The Flies by the Folio Society. Isn't is fantastic? Red, black, cracked glasses and ominous desert palms. What else do you need?

The reason I wanted to start March's #12books12months post with this is because, in some instances, a great outside can disguise a truly naff inside... Which brings me to Rupi Kaur's The Sun And Her Flowers.


I bought this book of Amazon and had it delivered to the office. I opened it and gave it a flick through, with what quickly became dread. I'm trying to think how to explain the feeling of reading through this book but it's difficult to say. I guess the best way would be to imagine going to a job interview, thinking you smashed it-- perfect answers, winning smile. Strong handshake at the door and intelligent closing statement. Walking outside and seeing in your reflection that you had done the whole thing with your top inside out at the label hanging out. That, 'ughhhhhh'. Absolutely mortifying cringeworthiness. Disappointment, dare I say revulsion, and just a quiet head-in-hands feeling

Possibly, this is an extreme reaction. That being said, I spent £8 for this. I feel robbed.

I passed the book around the office, and as colleagues flicked through with wide eyed confusion, that's the primary reaction I got. 

'You paid £12.99 for this?!' 

'No no, £7.99 of Amazon...'

And a bloody good thing too.

There's not really anything else I can say. Ultimately, it is harmless. Is it painfully melodramatic? Yes. Cheesy, insincere, fundamentally not interesting? To me, definitely. Possibly, this is just not my cup of tea. Maybe the circles I run in are not cultured enough to appreciate this. You may love it.

For me... I'll just say I liked the flowers on the cover.

1 comment:

  1. Haha, to be honest I've never really looked at this book. This post makes me very happy I haven't! That description of dread just says it all. Some books just aren't meant to be for us.

    The fact you spent money on it makes it all hte more heartbreaking. I have that issue all of the time. I'll buy a book and then, no matter how bad it is, feel like I have to read it cover to cover because I paid for it so it can't go to waste. What a form of self-torture.

    I hope your next read goes a little better!
    Asti || atypicalnarrative.com

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